IN SITU GEOTHERMAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY: AN APPROACH FOR BUILDING CLEANER AND GREENER ENVIRONMENT
 
More details
Hide details
1
Department of Civil and Urban Engineering, New York University, 6 Metro Tech, Brooklyn, New York 11201, USA
Publish date: 2016-01-01
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2016; 17(1):49–55
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Geothermal energy is abundant everywhere in the world. It certainly would be a great benefit for human being once it is produced by a sophisticated technology. Consequently, it would be the biggest console for earth considering environmental sustainability. Unfortunately, the current status of commercial production of geothermal energy primarily from hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma are limited to a few countries due to technological difficulties and production cost. This paper describes a simple technology where an in situ geothermal plant assisted by a heat pump would act as a high-temperature production (>150°C) to provide excellent capacity of energy generation. The issue related to costs is interestingly cheaper on production, comparing to other technologies, such as solar, hydro, wind, and traditional geothermal technology as described in this article. Therefore, it is suggested that heat pump assisted in situ geothermal energy sources has a great potentiality to be a prime energy source in near future. Since the technology has a number of positive characteristics (simple, safe, and provides continuous baseload, load following, or peaking capacity) and benign environmental attributes (zero emissions of CO2, SOx, and NOx), it certainly would be an interesting technology in both developed, and developing countries as an attractive option to produce clean energy to confirm a better environment.
 
REFERENCES (18)
1.
Annual Energy Outlook 2014. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).
 
2.
Breede K., Dzebisashvili K., Liu X., Falcone F. 2013. A systematic review of enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems: past, present and future. Geothermal Energy, 1(4).
 
3.
Buzăianu A., Moţoiu P., Csaki I., Popescu G., Ragnarstottir K., Guðlaugsson S., Guðmundsson D., Arnbjornsson A. 2015. Experiments on life cycle extensions of geothermal turbines by multi composite technology. Geothermics, 57, 1–7.
 
4.
Department of Energy – Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 2008. Geothermal (ground-source) heat pumps: market status, barriers to adoption, and actions to overcome barriers. Report ORNL/TM-2008/232.
 
5.
Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data 2010. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
 
6.
Hegerl G.C., Zwiers F.W. , Braconnot P., Gillett N.P., Luo Y., Marengo Orsini J.A., Nicholls N., Penner J.E. and Stott P.A. 2007. Understanding and attributing climate change.
 
7.
Houghton R.A. 2008. Carbon flux to the atmosphere from land-use changes: 1850-2005. In TRENDS: A Compendium of Data on Global Change. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tenn., U.S.A.
 
8.
Jansen E., Overpeck J., Briffa K.R., Duplessy J.-C., Joos F., Masson-Delmotte V., Olago D., Otto-Bliesner B., Peltier W.R., Rahmstorf S., Ramesh R., Raynaud D., Rind D., Solomina O., Villalba R., Zhang D. 2007. Paleoclimate. In: Climate change 2007: The physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom and New York, USA.
 
9.
Kolditz O., Jakobs L.A., Huenges E., Kohl T. 2013. Geothermal energy: A glimpse at the state of the field and an introduction to the journal Geothermal Energy, 1(1).
 
10.
Moonsri P., Kunchornrat J., and Namprakai P. 2015. Hybrid energy thermal water pump for producing hot water from a shallow well Thailand. J. Energy Eng., doi: 10.1061/(ASCE)EY.1943-7897.0000278,0415023.
 
11.
NRC 2002. Abrupt climate Change: Inevitable surprises. National Research Council. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, USA.
 
12.
NRC 2010. Advancing the science of climate change. National Research Council. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, USA.
 
13.
Öhman H. and Lundqvist P. 2014. Thermodynamic pre-determination of power generation potential in geothermal low-temperature applications. Geothermal Energy, 2(4), doi: 10.1186/s40517-014-0004-2.
 
14.
Solomon, S., Qin D., Manning M., Alley R.B., Berntsen T., Bindoff N.L., Chen Z., Chidthaisong A., Gregory J.M., Hegerl G.C., Heimann M., Hewitson B., Hoskins B.J., Joos F., Jouzel J., Kattsov V., Lohmann U., Matsuno T., Molina M., Nicholls N., Overpeck J., Raga G., Ramaswamy V., Ren J., Rusticucci M., Somerville R., Stocker T.F., Whetton P., Wood R.A., Wratt D. 2007. Technical summary. In: Climate change 2007: The physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.
 
15.
Tester J. et al. 2006. The future of geothermal energy: impact of enhanced. Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Idaho National Laboratory.
 
16.
U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis. 2012. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
 
17.
UNEP/WMO 2011. Integrated assessment of black carbon and tropospheric ozone: summary for decision makers. United Nations Environmental Program and the World Meteorological Society.
 
18.
Xianbiao Bu, Lingbao Wang, Huashan Li 2013. Performance analysis and working fluid selection for geothermal energy-powered organic Rankine-vapor compression air conditioning. Geothermal Energy, 1(2).