Scores:
12
MNiSW
120.9
ICV
 
 

BIOCONVERSION OF CITROFORTUNELLA MICROCARPA FRUIT WASTE INTO LACTIC ACID BY LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM

Cesar V. Ortinero 1, 2  ,  
 
1
Department of Environmental Science, Central Luzon State University 3120, Science City of Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines
2
Department of Chemistry, Central Luzon State University 3120, Science City of Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Central Luzon State University 3120, Science City of Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines
J. Ecol. Eng. 2017; 18(4):35–41
Publish date: 2017-07-01
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ABSTRACT:
The processing of Citrofortunella mircocarpa fruit juice generates large volume of solid waste, causing disposal problem. Several studies have demonstrated that wastes from agricultural and food processing industries such as fruit and vegetable peels contain high amount of polysaccharides that can be transformed into useful chemicals, including lactic acid, through fermentation. Lactic acid is widely used in various industries, such as in the manufacture of biodegradable plastic, and the demand for this chemical justifies the search of renewable feedstock for its biotechnological production. This study aimed to produce lactic acid from C. microcarpa fruit waste biomass through fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum. The hydrolysate from C. microcarpa fruit waste was prepared, inoculated with different amounts of L. plantarum cell suspension, and incubated for three days. Lactic acid production was monitored daily. The lactic acid produced from the fermentation was precipitated as calcium lactate crystals. The identity of the crystals was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and paper chromatography. The highest lactic acid production was observed in fermentation mixtures containing the highest number of L. plantarum cells. Within three days of fermentation, the amount of lactic acid production increased with increasing period of incubation. Partial characterization of the crystals recovered from the fermentation mixtures by FTIR spectroscopy showed that the peaks in the spectrum were consistent with the chemical structure of lactate. Paper chromatography results likewise confirmed that the crystals are lactate. C. microcarpa fruit waste can afford lactic acid when fermented with L. plantarum. The results of the study may serve as basis for the development of technology for the utilization of C. microcarpa fruit waste biomass as renewable resource for industrial production of lactic acid.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Cesar V. Ortinero   
Department of Environmental Science, Central Luzon State University, 3120 Science City of Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines
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