COLLOIDS IN SEPTIC TANK EFFLUENT AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON FILTER PERMEABILITY
Marcin Spychała 1  
,  
Jakub Nieć 1  
,  
Natalia Walczak 1  
,  
 
 
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1
Faculty of Land Reclamation and Environmental Engineering Department of Hydraulic and Sanitary Engine-ering, University of Life Sciences in Poznan, Wojska Polskiego St. 28, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
2
Firma Instalacyjno-Budowlana Jerzy Czwordon, Powstania Listopadowego St. 20, 63-400 Ostrów Wielkopolski, Poland
Publish date: 2015-09-09
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2015; 16(4):74–80
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to evaluate the content of colloids in septic tank effluent and their impact on textile filter permeability. Measurements were performed on septic tank effluent without suspended solids but containing colloids and without colloids - including only dissolved substances (filtered by micro-filters and centrifuged). The study was conducted on unclogged and clogged textile filter coupons. During the study the following measurements were conducted: turbidity, chemical oxygen demand and hydraulic conductivity of textile filter coupons. The colloid size range was assumed to be less than 1.2 microns according to the literature. Despite the relatively low content in the septic tank effluent the colloids played an important role in the clogging process. Both the filtering media, filled with low (unclogged) and high content of biomass (clogged) were sensitive to the clogging process acceleration due to the possibility of small diameter pore closure and oxygen access termination. Moreover, small size pores were probably sensitive to closing or bridging by small size colloidal particles.
 
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