EFFECT OF REACTIVE MATERIALS ON THE CONTENT OF SELECTED ELEMENTS IN INDIAN MUSTARD GROWN IN CR(VI)-CONTAMINATED SOILS
Maja Radziemska 1  
,  
Zbigniew Mazur 2  
,  
 
 
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1
Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
2
Faculty of Environmental Management and Agriculture, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Pl. Łódzki 4, 10-727 Olsztyn, Poland
Publish date: 2016-04-01
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2016; 17(2):141–147
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Reactive materials represent a promising agent for environmental co-remediation. The research was aimed to determine the influence of hexavalent chromium in doses of 0, 25, 50, and 150 mg Cr(VI).kg-1 of soil as well as zero valent-iron, and lignite additives on the content of macroelements in the Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.). The average accumulation of the analysed elements in Indian mustard grown in Cr(VI) contaminated soil were found to follow the decreasing order Mg>Na>P>Ca>K. Soil contamination at 150 mg Cr(VI).kg-1 of soil led to the highest increase in magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium content in Indian mustard. The application of zero-valent iron had a positive influence on the average Na and K content of the tested plant. The application of lignite had a positive influence on the average magnesium, sodium and calcium content in the above-ground parts of the studied plant. In the non-amended treatments (without reactive materials), the increasing rates of chromium (VI) had an explicitly positive effect on the content of phosphorous and sodium in Indian mustard.
 
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