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Effect of Application of Soil Amendments on the PAHs Level in the Fire-Affected Forest Soil
Petra Martínez Barroso 1  
,   Jan Winkler 2  
,   Jan Oulehla 1  
,   Magdalena Daria Vaverková 1,3  
 
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1
Department of Applied and Landscape Ecology, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Institute of Civil Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, ul. Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Magdalena Daria Vaverková   

Department of Applied and Landscape Ecology, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2022; 23(3):26–38
 
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ABSTRACT
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are introduced to the environment from anthropogenic and natural sources. The most significant natural source of PAH are wildfires and volcanic eruptions. The PAHs occurring in the soil mostly bind to the root system of plants. Phytodegradation, specifically rhizospheric degradation, can reduce the PAH levels in soil with the help of plants roots. A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of application of soil amendments on the PAHs level in the burnt soil (BS). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of application of soil amendments (compost, biochar, and bentonite) on the PAHs level after performing experiment with two grass species (Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra). Biochar and compost turned out to be the most effective amendments, regardless of the used grass species. Phytomanaged BS without added amendments also demonstrated the potential for PAH dissipation, but only in the case of Festuca rubra. It has been proven that the application of soil amendments together with the test grass species induced important changes in the BS properties (alteration of soil pH with related change of Kow of individual PAHs; root system on which soil microorganisms thrive) which evoked an increased bioavailability of PAHs.