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Food Waste – Challenges and Approaches for New Devices
 
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1
Department of Revitalization and Architecture, Institute of Civil Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02 776 Warsaw, Poland
2
Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1665, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Aleksandra Jakimiuk   

Department of Revitalization and Architecture, Institute of Civil Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02 776 Warsaw, Poland
Publication date: 2021-03-01
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2021; 22(3):231–238
 
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ABSTRACT
Food waste has recently received attention due to its environmental, economic and social impacts. Final processing of food waste encounters a number of technical challenges, arising from weak physical structure of food waste with weak porosity, high content of water, and low carbon-to-nitrogen relation. This study deals with the research of food waste processing in households by using an automatic device. The main objective of the study was to assess the toxicity of the end-product produced by an automatic device. The research included 10 experiments. The input foundation consisted of common food waste generated in household kitchens. Following its processing, the end-product was tested in a pot experiment for the germination capacity and biomass increase in different concentrations. The end-product was mixed with the reference soil in concentrations 5/95, 30/70, 50/50 (tested/reference substrate). The testing included three different plant species, i.e. Sinapis alba L., Hordeum vulgare L. and Cannabis sativa L. The germination capacity of plants and their increase in biomass were evaluated after 21 days. The increase in biomass was monitored by using the Before-After-Control-Impact method. The plants developed much better without the end-product additive to the soil substrate than with its small addition. The best germination capacity in the case of end-product addition was observed in the concentration ratio 30/70 in all plants. In spite of this, the highest increase in biomass was recorded in the concentration ratio 5/95. This might have caused the occurrence of mould in the pots. The test shows that the end-product made of food waste is toxic to plants; therefore, it is not recommended for direct application as a soil amendment.