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Growth Kinetics and Toxicity of Pseudomonas fredriksbergsis Grown on Phenol as Sole Carbon Source
 
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Chemical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Mutah University, Karak, 61710, Jordan
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Biology Department, College of Science, Mutah University, Mutah, Karak, 61710, Jordan
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Prince Faisal Center for Dead Sea, Environmental and Energy Research, Mutah University, Karak, 61710, Jordan
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Department of Medical Laboratory Analysis, College of Science, Mutah University, Mutah, Karak, 61710, Jordan
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Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Mutah University, Karak, 61710, Jordan
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Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mutah University, Karak, 61710, Jordan
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Salah H. Aljbour   

Chemical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Mutah University, Karak, 61710, Jordan
 
 
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ABSTRACT
Phenol is one of the main pollutants that have a serious impact on the environment and can even be very critical to human health. The biodegradation of phenol can be considered an increasingly important pollution control process. In this study, the degradation of phenol by Pseudomonas fredriksbergsis was investigated for the first time under different growth conditions. Six different initial concentrations of phenol were used as the primary substrate. Culture conditions had an important effect on these cells' ability to biodegrade phenol. The best growth of this organism and its highest biodegradation level of phenol were noticed at pH 7, temperature 28 °C, and periods of 36 and 96 h, respectively. The highest biodegradation rate was perceived at 700 mg/L initial phenol concentration. Approximately 90% of the phenol (700 mg / L) was removed in less than 96 hours of incubation time. It was found that the Haldane model best fitted the relationship between the specific growth rate and the initial phenol concentration, whereas the phenol biodegradation profiles time could be adequately described by the modified Gompertz model. The obtained parameters from the Haldane equation are: 0.062 h−1, 11 ppm, and 121 ppm for Haldane's maximum specific growth rate, the half-saturation coefficient, and the Haldane’s growth kinetics inhibition coefficient, respectively. The Haldane equation fitted the experimental data by minimizing the sum of squared error (SSR) to 1.36x10-3.