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Identification and Screening of Biofilm-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Mangrove Sediment for Plastic Degradation
 
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1
Research Center for Oceanography, National Research and Innovation Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia
 
2
Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Brawijaya, Malang, Indonesia
 
 
Corresponding author
Nur Fitriah Afianti   

Research Center for Oceanography, National Research and Innovation Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia
 
 
 
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ABSTRACT
Plastic waste is particularly harmful to human life and the environment since it is difficult to degrade. This plastic waste contributes to seawater pollution, which can disrupt the food chain and harm biodiversity in the environment, particularly the mangrove ecosystem. Mangroves act as a sediment barrier and help to decrease coastal abrasion. In the natural environment, indigenous bacteria are crucial to the bioremediation of environmental pollution, including plastic waste pollution. Bioremediation is considered environmentally friendly and can accelerate the degradation time of waste containing toxic compounds. Biofilm-forming bacteria also play an important role in the biodegradation of plastics. This research was conducted to isolate bacteria from mangrove sediment and characterize their potential as a candidate to degrade polyethylene plastic. We have found that 25 of 53 PEG-degrading bacteria could form biofilms on plastic surfaces. Seven bacterial isolates showed the ability to produce clear zones during the degradation of PEG and biofilm formation. The seven potential bacterial isolates identified using 16s rRNA gene as Bacillus sporotermodurans, Cytobacillus firmus, Rossellomorea vietnamensis, Stutzerimonas stutzeri, Dyadobacter jejuensis, Rhodococcus sp., and Achromobacter sp.
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