The Effect of Mineral and Organic Fertilization on Some Soil Chemical Properties after Perennial Ryegrass Cultivation
Ewa Możdżer 1  
,  
Piotr Styrczula 1, 2  
 
 
More details
Hide details
1
Department of Soil Science, Grassland Mangement and Environmental Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, ul. Słowackiego 17, 71-434 Szczecin, Poland
2
Factory of Mineral Fertilizers „Fosfan” SA, Szczecin
Publish date: 2019-02-01
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2019; 20(2):124–130
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
The three-factorial vegetative-pot experiment was carried out in 2007-2008. The first factor consisted of series with and without compost of municipal sewage sludge and the second factor was doses of multi-component mineral fertilizers. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) of Stadion cv. was the test plant. The purpose of the work was to determine the effect of mineral multi-component fertilizers with combined organic fertilization on the content total and forms assimilable of macroelements in soil. Single doses of mineral fertilizers and urea increased the content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the soil compared to the control. Doubling the doses of fertilizers and urea increased the content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the soil as compared to single doses. Types of multicomponent mineral fertilizers with the addition of urea did not have a major impact on the diversity of studied elements content in the soil. After two years of experiment, the soil to which compost was introduced in spring contained more nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the control object by 21% and 8.96% respectively Potassium content in the soil was the same as in the control object. Doubling the doses of mineral fertilizers and urea with the participation of compost resulted in an increase in the content of available forms of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and sulfate in the soil by 2.52%, 9.12%, 2.25% and 0.80%, respectively, in comparison with single doses. The content of available forms of phosphorus and potassium in the soil after the end of the experiment was greater than the available forms of magnesium and sulfur.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Ewa Możdżer   
Department of Soil Science, Grassland Mangement and Environmental Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, ul. Słowackiego 17, 71-434 Szczecin, Poland