PL EN
Optimizing the Reduction of Total Suspended Solids in Pump Water from Fish Factories Through Electrocoagulation using Response Surface Methodology
 
Więcej
Ukryj
1
Universidad de Lima, Instituto de Investigación Científica (IDIC), Av. Javier Prado Este 4600, Surco, Lima, Perú
2
Instituto Tecnológico de la Producción (DIDITT), Carretera a Ventanilla Km. 5, 6. Callao, Perú
3
Pesquera Diamante S.A., Amador Merino Reyna 307, Edificio Nacional, piso 12 y 13, San Isidro, Lima, Perú
AUTOR DO KORESPONDENCJI
Edwar Aguilar-Ascón   

Universidad de Lima, Instituto de Investigación Científica (IDIC), Av. Javier Prado Este 4600, Surco, Lima, Perú
Data publikacji: 06-06-2021
 
J. Ecol. Eng. 2021; 22(6):269–277
 
SŁOWA KLUCZOWE
DZIEDZINY
 
STRESZCZENIE
This study aims to optimize the removal of total suspended solids (TSS) in pump water from fish flour factories through electrocoagulation technology and to determine the effects of the main operation parameters. Pump water has high conductivity (40.1 mS), due to the presence of dissolved salts and contains high concentration of organic substances (12,360 mg/L of TSS and 520 mg/L of fats). In this study, pump water was treated in an electrocoagulation reactor with aluminum electrodes using Response Surface Methodology with a 3k factorial design based on two factors, current intensity (I) of 8–13 A and treatment time (t) of 20–40 minutes. The percentage of TSS removed from the water was used as the response variable. The results revealed that I and t significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the process. In accordance, the optimal operational parameters for TSS removal were I = 13 A and t = 30 minutes. Using these conditions, TSS removal efficiency of 99.9% was achieved. The sewage sludge generated with these optimal process conditions indicated 19.3% of ash content, 6.2% of salt, 1.7% of aluminum, 0.3% of iron, 0.4% of potassium, 256 ppm of zinc, and 2.1% of phosphorus. Hence, the results of this study affirm that electrocoagulation can be considered as a solution for marine pollution caused by fishing industries.